“Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales,” Fun Facts

I recently seen an advance screening of the  “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales,” and I hate to post spoilers so in celebration of the upcoming release I am sharing with you my favorite fun facts. By the way the movie was awesome so make sure you see it in theaters this weekend in theaters worldwide May 26th. 

Johnny Depp returns to the big screen as the iconic, swashbuckling anti-hero Jack Sparrow in the all-new “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales,” a rip-roaring adventure that finds down-on-his-luck Captain Jack feeling the winds of ill-fortune blowing strongly his way when deadly ghost sailors, led by the terrifying Captain Salazar, escape from the Devil’s Triangle bent on killing every pirate at sea—notably Jack

My Favorite Fun Facts  

In typical “Pirates of the Caribbean” tradition—which has seen the cast and crew
of the previous four films battling extreme weather conditions all over the
world—the film’s primary shooting location of Gold Coast, Queensland,
Australia, suffered its wettest conditions in 61 years due to a cyclone named
Marcia.

The extraordinarily detailed St. Martin town set, designed by Nigel Phelps and
executed by supervising art director Ian Gracie and construction coordinator
Bernie Childs, sits on five acres of verdant terrain in the Hinterlands suburb of
Maudsland and is an artist’s concept of a fanciful, teeming British colonial village
in the Caribbean. Although most of the structures were only fronts, at least
two—Grimes’ Tavern and Swift’s Chart House—were in three dimensions,
wonderfully and atmospherically decked out by Beverley Dunn’s set decoration
department. Some of the buildings were cleverly designed to be picked up and
moved in their entirety to different sections of the village to give even a greater
sense of the town’s size.

Costume designer Penny Rose and her team converted an entire 20,000 foot
sound stage at Village Roadshow Studios in Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
into a wardrobe warehouse filled with 2000 costumes, hats, shoes and
accessories, all meticulously arranged by character names, types, genders and
ages.

To properly age the wardrobe, Penny Rose and her team used a variety of
innovative techniques, including putting them along with pebbles in a cement
mixer, using cheese graters to wear them down and, occasionally, taking
blowtorches to materials as well!

DeadMenTellNoTales586e902183edb.jpg

Key hair designer Peter Swords King’s department created more than 1,000 wigs
for the film, and on the biggest days made up 700 extras and 30 principals, with
a main team of 22 people and another 70 in a vast tent for background, stunt
players and wranglers. The facility was humorously referred to as “the sausage
factory.”

Captain Jack Sparrow’s hero rum bottle prop is an actual 18th century item from
England. Meanwhile, several of the film’s parasols were handmade by a little old
lady in her 70s in Brisbane, one of the last people in the world who do such
craftsmanship.

When the “Dead Men Tell No Tales” company filmed in the thick jungle of Tamborine Mountain, they had to don hardhats to protect their heads from remarkably heavy black beans falling from the ancient trees. The Australian crew, tongues firmly planted in cheek, told their colleagues from America and other countries that they were actually for “drop bears,” the mythical monster marsupials resembling large, carnivorous koalas, which supposedly drop on to unsuspecting victims’ heads from tall treetops.

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